1982


February
New York City radio station WABC switches to an all-talk format.

Feb 22
New York City Mayor Ed Koch announces he will run for governor.

Apr 7
Temperatures in New York City drop to 21 degrees F, lowest here for this date.

Apr 8
Temperatures in New York City drop to 25 degrees F, lowest here for this date.

Jun 17
The first of 227 Love Canal houses is demolished.

Jul 12
New York State studies show Dioxin levels in the Love Canal area are dangerously high.

Jul 15
The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) declares that houses a block and a half and more away from Love Canal are safe. The scientific panel that made the study disagrees.

Jul 22
Ernest G. Binnette attempts to kill himself by blowing up his Gananda home. He is given five years probation for fourth-degree arson.

September
Lieutenant-governor Mario M. Cuomo defeats New York City mayor Ed Koch for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.

October
Albany mayor Erastus Corning 2nd is transferred from Albany Medical Center to the intensive care unit of Boston University Hospital.

Oct 27
Corning writes down the reasons for struggling to live.

November
Mario M. Cuomo narrowly defeats the Republican nominee Lewis Lehrman to be elected governor of New York State. ** New York City's Canal Street Bridge, for carrying West Side Highway traffic over the Holland Tunnel, is dismantled and sold for scrap. ** New York City's Queensboro Bridge is closed for repairs for five hours every weekday.

Dec 4
Temperatures in New York City climb to 72 degrees F, the highest reading here for this date.

Dec 5
New York temperatures reach 63 degrees, setting a record here for the date.

Dec 6
A third daily record is set in New York when the temperature reaches 68 degrees.

Dec 23
Corning writes a long, sometimes rambling, letter to his daughter Elizabeth, imparting his life philosophy to her.

Dec 25
Temperatures in New York City rise to 64 degrees F, the highest temperature here for this date.

Dec 26
New York temperatures reach 63 degrees F, setting a daily record for the second day in a row.

 

City
The city begins a $6,300,000, state-bond-financed project to rehabilitate the subway system. ** French actor-singer Yves Montand becomes the first popular singer to appear at the Metropolitan Opera House. ** With the cessation of rail traffic over the Spuyten Duyvil swing bridge, over the Harlem River, the bridge is left in the open position. ** London's Saatchi and Saatchi agency buys New York's Compton Communications. ** American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T) moves some of its corporate staff from New York City to its facility in Basking Ridge, New Jersey. ** Mount Sinai Hospital establishes the first department of geriatrics in an American medical school. ** Federal District Court judge Thomas P. Griesa blocks a landfill permit for the Westway Highway projects, claiming the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers ignored the effects on stripped bass hatcheries in the Hudson.

State
The city of Albany issues a master plan for preserving and restoring the state Capitol Building. ** Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reusch purchase the Avon Inn.

Batavia
The Crickler Bottling Works warehouse is demolished. ** A new room is added to the back of the west wing of the Holland Land Office building, to display the Genesee County's former gallows.

Rochester
U of R professor Edward Lsansky is reunited with his wife who had been held without a visa in Russia for six years. ** A sister city link with the Russian city of Novgorod is established. ** Donald Gill is named Chairman and CEO of Bausch and Lomb. ** Wilson High School becomes a school for middle grades and is renamed Wilson Magnet School. ** City YMCAs begin a School Age Child Care program.

 

1983


January
Albany mayor Erastus Corning 2nd buys a modified van with a wheelchair lift and special controls, has it parked outside of Boston University hospital.

Jan 1
Rochester's Democrat and Chronicle celebrates its 150th anniversary (began as the Evening Advertiser).

Jan 25
Batavia's Genesee County Courthouse Historic District is placed on the State and National Register of Historic Places.

February
Corning, now diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat, jots down some thoughts on his condition. It will be the last thing he writes.

Feb 7
Black composer and pianist Eubie Blake turns 100.

Feb 10
The first long-distance telephone service carried on lightwave systems in the U. S. goes into operation, from Washington, D. C. to New York City.

Feb 11
A northeaster hits the eastern seaboard of the U. S. New York City gets 22 inches of snow.

Feb 12
Eubie Blake dies at his Brooklyn home.

Feb 22
Corning is operated on to remove a tumor from his large intestine and to halt internal bleeding. Half of his intestine is removed.

Mar 12
Corning is operated on to treat bleeding ulcers at the base of the esophagus.

Apr 30
Russian-born choreographer George Balanchine dies in New York City at the age of 79.

May 17
A Federal study shows Love Canal residents are in no more danger than other Niagara Falls residents.

May 28
Albany mayor Erastus Corning 2nd dies at Boston University Hospital at the age of 73, of a blood clot in the lungs. Less than three hours later, under a rainy Saturday sky, his city learns of his death.

May 31
Mayor Corning's body lies in state, in a closed coffin, in Albany's Episcopal Cathedral of All Saints, during an all-day downpour. Over 8,000 mourners pay their final respects.

Jun 1
The sun clears in Albany as Mayor Corning is buried in the family plot in Albany Rural Cemetery, as close to 10,000 mourners line the streets. Governor Mario Cuomo delivers the Bible reading.

Jun 8
Demolition of the Love Canal elementary school is begun.

Jun 21
A U. S. congressional agency states that the Federal government had no basis for declaring the Love Canal neighborhood safe to live in.

July
Wall Street trader Michael Milken floats the first $1,000,000,000 junk bond offering, to finance the expansion of MCI. ** Albany mayor Thomas M. Whalen III appoints a committee to plan for the city's tricentennial on July 22, 1986.

Sep 12
The state bottle law goes into effect, setting up recycling provisions.

Sep 28
The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finds new chemical leaks at Love Canal.

Oct 7
An earthquake measuring 5.3 on the Richter Scale strikes Hamilton County.

Oct 10
1,300 ex-residents of Love Canal tentatively settle a suit against Occidental Petroleum, Niagara Falls, Niagara County and the Board of Education, for $20,000,000.

November
The north pedestrian walk of New York City's George Washington Bridge is shut down.

Nov 28
Syracuse University converts to a computerized registration system.

Dec 24
Temperatures in New York City drop to 6 degrees F, the lowest here for this date.

City
The Trump Tower building is completed. ** Gordon Bunshaft's Lever House is declared a landmark. ** South Street Seaport's Market Building opens. ** Pace University opens a school of computer science and information systems. ** A vessel collides with the Spuyten Duyvil Swing Barge, leaving it stuck in the open position. Being no longer in use, It's left that way. ** The Metropolitan Museum mounts an Edouard Manet retrospective. ** Alaska Airlines moves from the American Stock Exchange to the New York Stock Exchange. ** The Wall Street brokerage firm of Drexel Burnham begins using junks bonds to finance leveraged buyouts. ** The American International Group moves its data center from New York City to East Orange, New Jersey. ** U. S. Customs officials at JFK Airport in New York City seize a kilogram of heroin from the United Arab Emirates, destined for Pakistani nationals in the city. ** News anchor Connie Chung leaves CBS for NBC. ** Dr. Veronica Prego contracts AIDS when she pricks her finger with an infected needle at a Brooklyn hospital. She later sues the city. ** The Metro North commuter system is created, to serve city bound commuters from the north. ** A report commissioned by governor Cuomo recommends abandoning plans for the Westway Highway and using the funds for mass transit. He rejects the findings. ** Olympia & York purchases the office tower at 125 Broad Street from Sol G. Atlas and John P. McGrath. ** Manhattan's ABC Carpet and Home Warehouse opens a warehouse on the industrial stretch of Bronx River Avenue. ** Kent Barwick is named president of the Municipal Art Society.

State
The Seaway Trail is made a National Recreation Trail. ** Assemblyman Richard J. Conners is named chairman of the new veterans' affairs committee. ** William Kennedy's Albany novel Ironweed is published. ** The Rochester Americans (Amerks) win the American Hockey League's Calder Cup. ** The burned railroad bridge over the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie, is declared to be structurally sound. ** Assistant Monroe County district attorney Bob King, now a Republican, narrowly loses a bid for district attorney to Howard R. Relin. ** Mario Cuomo takes office as governor.

Film
Risky Business
, is a hit for Tom Cruise, introduces Rebecca de Marnay and popularizes Bausch & Lomb's Wayfarers sunglasses.

Rochester
The Wegmans supermarket chain founds an employee Scholarship Program.

 

1984


1983
January
Albany mayor Erastus Corning 2nd buys a modified van with a wheelchair lift and special controls, has it parked outside of Boston University hospital.

Jan 1
Rochester's Democrat and Chronicle celebrates its 150th anniversary (began as the Evening Advertiser).

Jan 25
Batavia's Genesee County Courthouse Historic District is placed on the State and National Register of Historic Places.

February
Corning, now diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat, jots down some thoughts on his condition. It will be the last thing he writes.

Feb 2
Ground breaking ceremonies are held for the new, rebuilt Crescent Beach Hotel in Monroe County on Lake Ontario.

Feb 7
Black composer and pianist Eubie Blake turns 100.

Feb 10
The first long-distance telephone service carried on lightwave systems in the U. S. goes into operation, from Washington, D. C. to New York City.

Feb 11
A northeaster hits the eastern seaboard of the U. S. New York City gets 22 inches of snow.

Feb 12
Eubie Blake dies at his Brooklyn home.

Feb 22
Corning is operated on to remove a tumor from his large intestine and to halt internal bleeding. Half of his intestine is removed.

Mar 12
Corning is operated on to treat bleeding ulcers at the base of the esophagus.

Apr 30
Russian-born choreographer George Balanchine dies in New York City at the age of 79.

May 17
A Federal study shows Love Canal residents are in no more danger than other Niagara Falls residents.

May 28
Albany mayor Erastus Corning 2nd dies at Boston University Hospital at the age of 73, of a blood clot in the lungs. Less than three hours later, under a rainy Saturday sky, his city learns of his death.

May 31
Mayor Corning's body lies in state, in a closed coffin, in Albany's Episcopal Cathedral of All Saints, during an all-day downpour. Over 8,000 mourners pay their final respects.

Jun 1
The sun clears in Albany as Mayor Corning is buried in the family plot in Albany Rural Cemetery, as close to 10,000 mourners line the streets. Governor Mario Cuomo delivers the Bible reading.

Jun 8
Demolition of the Love Canal elementary school is begun.

Jun 21
A U. S. congressional agency states that the Federal government had no basis for declaring the Love Canal neighborhood safe to live in.

July
Wall Street trader Michael Milken floats the first $1,000,000,000 junk bond offering, to finance the expansion of MCI. ** Albany mayor Thomas M. Whalen III appoints a committee to plan for the city's tricentennial on July 22, 1986.

Sep 12
The state bottle law goes into effect, setting up recycling provisions.

Sep 16
The rebuilt Crescent Beach Hotel has its grand re-opening.

Sep 28
The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finds new chemical leaks at Love Canal.

Oct 7
An earthquake measuring 5.3 on the Richter Scale strikes Hamilton County.

Oct 10
1,300 ex-residents of Love Canal tentatively settle a suit against Occidental Petroleum, Niagara Falls, Niagara County and the Board of Education, for $20,000,000.

November
The north pedestrian walk of New York City's George Washington Bridge is shut down. ** New York voters elect to rehabilitate the Erie Canal for recreational purposes. ** A conference is held at Philipsburg Manor, New York, entitled "The End of the Revolution in New York State".

Nov 28
Syracuse University converts to a computerized registration system.

Dec 24
Temperatures in New York City drop to 6 degrees F, the lowest here for this date.

City
The Trump Tower building is completed. ** Gordon Bunshaft's Lever House is declared a landmark. ** South Street Seaport's Market Building opens. ** Pace University opens a school of computer science and information systems. ** A vessel collides with the Spuyten Duyvil Swing Barge, leaving it stuck in the open position. Being no longer in use, It's left that way. ** The Metropolitan Museum mounts an Edouard Manet retrospective. ** Alaska Airlines moves from the American Stock Exchange to the New York Stock Exchange. ** The Wall Street brokerage firm of Drexel Burnham begins using junks bonds to finance leveraged buyouts. ** The American International Group moves its data center from New York City to East Orange, New Jersey. ** U. S. Customs officials at JFK Airport in New York City seize a kilogram of heroin from the United Arab Emirates, destined for Pakistani nationals in the city. ** News anchor Connie Chung leaves CBS for NBC. ** Dr. Veronica Prego contracts AIDS when she pricks her finger with an infected needle at a Brooklyn hospital. She later sues the city. ** The Metro North commuter system is created, to serve city bound commuters from the north. ** A report commissioned by governor Cuomo recommends abandoning plans for the Westway Highway and using the funds for mass transit. He rejects the findings. ** Olympia & York purchases the office tower at 125 Broad Street from Sol G. Atlas and John P. McGrath. ** Manhattan's ABC Carpet and Home Warehouse opens a warehouse on the industrial stretch of Bronx River Avenue. ** Kent Barwick is named president of the Municipal Art Society. ** Beyer Blinder Belle's cast iron Bogardus Building, at 15-19 Fulton Street in the South Street Seaport area, is completed. The original, designed by James Bogardus, had been dismantled and stored, then stolen. The new version was recreated from drawings. ** Despite critical disparagement (New Yorkers loved it) of their first combination hotel and office buiilding, One United Nations Plaza, Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo & Associates Two United Nations Plaza, is completed. ** The Hong Kong Bank Building at Canal and Centre streets is built. ** Mariner Jack Putnam begins working at the South Street Seaport's Book & Chart Store.

State
The Seaway Trail is made a National Recreation Trail. ** Assemblyman Richard J. Conners is named chairman of the new veterans' affairs committee. ** William Kennedy's Albany novel Ironweed is published. ** The Rochester Americans (Amerks) win the American Hockey League's Calder Cup. ** The burned railroad bridge over the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie, is declared to be structurally sound. ** Assistant Monroe County district attorney Bob King, now a Republican, narrowly loses a bid for district attorney to Howard R. Relin. ** Mario Cuomo takes office as governor. ** Black Buffalo photographers Willie B. Seals and John Tobias spend a day photographing Forest Lawn Cemetery. ** The cupola of Batavia's City Hall, removed in 1960, is restored by the Genesee County Landmark Society.

Film
Risky Business
, is a hit for Tom Cruise, introduces Rebecca de Marnay, and popularizes Bausch & Lomb's Wayfarers sunglasses.

Rochester
The Wegmans supermarket chain founds an employee Scholarship Program. ** The University of Rochester 's Rush Rhees Library Rare Book, Manuscripts and Archives collection is renamed the Rare Books and Special Collections.

 

1984


February
The south walk of the George Washington Bridge is shut down, ending pedestrian access to the structure. ** New York lawyer and politician Herman Badillo becomes chairman of the Board of Directors of the State of New York Mortgage Agency, serves through May of 1986.

Feb 7
Syracuse University is chosen as the site of the Case Center (Center for Technology in Computer Applications and Software Engineering).

Apr 15
Christopher Thomas kills ten people, eight of them children, in a Brooklyn apartment on Palm Sunday.

Apr 21
The exhibition "The Lion at the Falls", depicting water-driven industry at the falls of the Genesee River in Rochester, opens at the city's Museum and Science Center.

Apr 29
Local history buffs meet at Hammondsport's Presbyterian Church to discuss starting a historical society.

May 20
A second meeting is held at Hammondsport to establish committees. After some discussion the name Crooked Lake Historical Association is chosen.

Jun 8
Rochester kicks off City Jubilee, a summer-long sesquicentennial birthday party.

Jun 15
Broadway composer-lyricist Meredith Willson dies at the age of 82.

Jul 12
Democratic U. S. presidential candidate Walter F. Mondale announces he has chosen U. S. Representative from New York Geraldine A. Ferraro as his running mate, making her the first major party female candidate for Vice-president.

Jul 16
Governor Mario M. Cuomo delivers the keynote address to the Democratic convention in San Francisco.

September
Because of increased demand, New York City adds a 718 telephone area code. ** Eastman Kodak announces plans to market plain-paper copiers manufactured in Japan by Canon Inc.

Sep 3
A bomb blast in Montreal's Central Station kills three people, wounds 47 others. Rochester resident Thomas Brigham is held for the crime.

Sep 10
Bronx District Attorney Mario Merola announces a grand jury investigation of the Schiavone Company, on a subway contract.

Sep 30
The Crooked Lake Historical Association elects its first officers.

Oct 1
It is disclosed that the Bronx grand jury has indicted Schiavone Company executives on charges of defrauding the New York Transit Authority of $7,400,000.

Oct 27
A monument to western New York land agent Paolo Busti is erected next to Batavia's Holland Land Office, sponsored by the Paolo Busti Cultural Foundation of Genesee County.

Nov 2
The last diesel-powered train ends operations, on Metro North's Harlem Line. The entire line is now electrified.

Dec 9
The Federal government sues Occidental Petroleum for $45,000,000 over the Love Canal disaster.

Dec 17
Temperatures in New York City rise to 61 degrees F, the highest here for this date.

Dec 18
Temperatures in New York City rise to 63 degrees F, setting another daily record.

Dec 22
'Subway Vigilante' Bernhard Goetz shoots four blacks he claims tried to rob him, in New York City.

Dec 31
Biff and Rusty Brundage buy the Chester Union School in Cheshire, to convert it into a gift shop.

City
42% of males arrested for serious crimes in the Manhattan Central Booking office this year contain cocaine in their systems. ** The 1902 Dorilton apartment house is converted to a co-op. ** Wine expert and musician Raymond Thomas Wellington leaves his job as wine director of Manhattan's Windows on the World restaurant to go with the Aurora restaurant. ** Pace University president Edward J. Mortola is named chancellor. William B. Sharwell becomes president. ** The Metropolitan Museum of Art mounts a Vincent van Gogh retrospective. ** The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U. S. moves its computer operations to Leonia, New Jersey. ** Shearson Lehman decides to remain in New York City when it builds new offices, in return for concessions from the city. ** Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward launches Operation Pressure Point, to reclaim a lower Manhattan neighborhood infested with drug dealers. ** Heart specialist Dr. William Foley is named head of the vascular clinic and clinical professor of medicine at the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. ** Bruce Hlibok's Woman Talk is produced Off-Broadway. ** The Museum of Modern Art completes a series of four exhibitions and books of Berenice Abbott's works. ** Alfonso Pérez Sanchéz, director of Spain's Prado, chooses Metropolitan Museum of Art conservator John Brealey to clean and restore Velázquez' Las Meninas, causing a public outcry over the choice of a foreigner. ** The city's South Street Seaport Museum begins the process of replacing the steel wire standing rigging on the museum's bark Peking . ** The 70-acre Flushing Airport in College Point, Queens, is closed by the city. It will be allowed to revert to marshland. ** Hip hop (rap) supergroup Run-D. M. C., of Hollis, Queens, breaks in on the national scene, popularizes gold chains and untied sneakers. ** Brooklyn's Columbia Terrace housing development is built. ** The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers holds two days of hearings on the environmental impact of the proposed Westway Highway, especially on striped bass in the Hudson River).

State
The 2,616-acre Big Range area is added to the Adirondacks State Park. ** The Cardiff Giant is featured in the Museum of Wonders exhibit in the Farmer's Museum Main Barn at Cooperstown. ** The former lighthouse keeper's home at the Tibbett's Point Light on Cape Vincent is converted into a youth hostel. ** Exxon tanker captain Joseph Hazelwood is arrested for drunk driving, in Huntington. ** Mafia hit man Dominick Lofaro is arrested after he tries to sell a kilo of heroin to an undercover agent. ** U. S. Representative Geraldine Ferraro becomes the first female Democratic National Platform Committee chair. ** Buffalo's Polish-language magazine Ave Maria ceases publication. ** Assistant Monroe County district attorney Bob King, declining a Republican offer to run against Democratic state assemblywoman Louise M. Slaughter for the 13th District, takes a position as personnel director with a software company in Ontario County. ** The Avon Inn is registered as a State Historical Landmark. ** Richard Sherer begins publishing a newsletter for the Crooked Lake Historical Society of Hammondsport. ** DEC biologist Dave Mayack studies otters and minks, finds that those trapped in the acidified western Adirondacks contain the highest amounts of lead and cadmium in the state. ** A plaque is added to Batavia's 1919 Upton (Soldiers and Sailors) Monument war memorial, to honor veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam. ** The New York State Historical Records Advisory Board issues "Toward a Usable Past: Historical Records in the Empire State": concluding that the records in many archives are endangered, due to a variety of factors. ** The International Boxing Hall of Fame is established at Canastota. ** Tompkins County is down to 13 active post offices, down from a 1951 total of 73.

Brooklyn
The Columbia Terrace housing development is built. ** The piers of the New York Dock Company, made obsolete by containerization, are taken out of service around this time.
Buffalo
The Polish-language magazine Ave Maria ceases publication. ** Brian Meyer founds the Western New York Wares publishing company, to produce regional books.

Rochester
Bausch and Lomb acquires the Charles River company. ** Father Robert F. McNamara receives an honorary doctorate of letters from St. John Fisher College. ** The Security Trust Bank at East Main and South Water streets becomes the North Star Bank. ** The Ontario Beach Park Program Committee is formed to plan events for the park.

 

© 2005 David Minor / Eagles Byte

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