1833

( Updated 5 / 31 / 2004 )


Jan 1
The first issue of Knickerbocker Magazine is published, in New York City. ** Sidney Smith begins publishing Rochester's Evening Advertiser. He will soon turn it into a morning newspaper to distinguish it from the afternoon rival paper the Daily Advertiser.

Jan 7
Rochester dentist and machine gun inventor Josephus Requa is born in Ulster County to Charity Middagh and prominent physician James Jackson Requa.

Jan 8
New York businessman and philanthropist Lewis Tappan writes to his skeptic brother Benjamin, in Steubenville, Ohio, warning him of eternal damnation.

Jan 9
Land is purchased in New York City for the construction of a Custom House.

Feb 5
The state confirms a boundary surveyed by its agents Benjamin F. Butler, Peter A. Gray and Henry Seymour, and New Jersey agents Lucius K. C. Elmer, Theodore Freylinghuysen, and James Parker, as the states' common border.

Feb 23
New York state's Canal Commission authorizes a Chenango Canal to connect the Susquehanna River at Binghamton with the Erie Canal at Utica. John B. Jervis will be hired to supervise construction.

Feb 25
John Spencer Corning, son of Troy hardware merchant Erastus Corning and his wife Harriet, dies in the third month and twelfth day of his ninth year.

Feb 26
New Jersey confirms its new boundary with New York.

March
Connewango pioneer James Blanchard dies.

Mar 20
The Cayuga County town of Niles is formed from Sempronius.

Apr 15
The Allegany County town of West Almond is formed from the towns of Alfred, Almond, and Angelica.

May
Journeymen carpenters go on strike in New York City, win a wage increase after they're out for a month.

Jun 19
An announcement is posted in the Oswego Palladium for a sale of U. S.
property, primarily the Ship and Ship-House at Storr's (near Sackets Harbor). The sale will be held at the house of P. Butterfield, on the first Monday of August, and the buyer will be required to remove both structures from the premises, on or before the first day of November. Other naval equipment will also be auctioned.

July
The New York and Erie Railroad is organized.

Jul 1
The Connecticut legislature approves the merger of the New York and Stonington Railroad with the New York, Providence and Boston Railroad, to be called by the latter name.

Jul 4
Horatio Gates Spafford's widow Elizabeth Clarke Hewitt receives the patent on his compressed air engine.

Aug 1
Sailors' Snug Harbor opens, on Staten Island. ** A strike of journeymen shoemakers at Geneva is settled, with the artisans gaining wage increases.

Aug 14
Stock subscriptions of $500,000 are solicited for New York State's Rochester & Tonawanda Railroad Company. ** The General Trades Union (GTU) organizes in New York City, linking all city trade societies.

Sep 3
The New York Sun, the first penny newspaper, begins publication, under editor Benjamin Henry Day.

Sep 9
The Wood family begins presenting English-language opera in New York.

Sep 19
Mary Jemison, White Woman of the Genesee, dies at Buffalo Creek Reservation, in her early nineties.

November
New York City has spent $185,000 on the 13th Street water supply system, connecting to over 150 hydrants in all of the wards and digging the main well to a depth of 112 feet. $89.46 has been spent on funerals for three workers killed digging the well.

Nov 13
New York's Italian Opera House (later the National Theatre), at Leonard and Church streets, under the management of Da Ponte and Rivafinoli, opens with a production of Rossini's La Gazza Ladra. Former mayor Philip Hone attends the performance.

Nov 15
New York State lawyer Benjamin Franklin Butler becomes U. S. Attorney General.

Nov 27
A series of scientific lectures is begun at New York City's Mechanics Institute in Clinton Hall. Recent congressman Gulian C. Verplank makes the opening remarks.

City
The all-black Phoenix Society institutes a library and a job bank. ** Construction of fortifications is begun on Throgg's Neck overlooking Long Island Sound. ** Gideon Lee is elected mayor. ** Irish actor Tyrone Power (great grandfather of the film actor) makes his New York City debut. ** The first clipper ship, the Ann McKim, is built in Baltimore, to carry immigrants from New York to San Francisco. ** Twelve year-old future philologist George Adler is brought to the U. S. from Leipzig, Germany. ** The price of a seat on the New York Stock Exchange rises from $100 to $150. ** Construction begins on Fort Schuyler on Throg's Neck in the Bronx. ** 17-year-old E. S. Jaffray joins his uncle J. R. Jaffray in his dry goods wholesale business. ** A political committee reports on fraudulent practices in local elections but, many of the members having vested interest in the outcome, nothing is done. ** Tammany politician Samuel Swartwout, collector of the Port of New York, threatens a group of merchants that he will move the customs house uptown if they don't lend him $7,000 on the strength of (dubious) New Jersey's Meadowlands holdings. Nothing happens when they refuse. ** The merchant shipping firm of Josiah Macy & Sons opens offices at 189 Front Street.

State
U. S. senator William L. Marcy is elected governor. ** Warren Huff of Québec, Canada, settles the Allegany County village of Alma. ** The Chemung Canal is completed. ** Geneva lawyer Charles Butler visits the Toledo and Chicago areas, makes real estate investments there. ** Henry Inman paints a portrait of Erastus Corning, Jr. ** The Reverend William Arthur moves to Perry along with his family, including three-year-old Chester Alan Arthur, future U. S. president. They live in Perry for the next four years. ** East Bloomfield township is established. ** Winslow Pratt, son of Eagle Harbor settler Nehemiah Pratt, settles on the Ridge Road. ** Clinton County organizes the Great Ausable Railroad Company. ** The family of Martha L. White, en route to Michigan via the Erie Canal, is delayed for two days at Albany because of record spring rains. ** Naturalist Constantine Rafinesque revisits the Troy area. ** The Oneida Standard begins publication at Waterville. ** The Baptist Church in Cheshire moves to Canandaigua. ** Stephen White, president of the East Boston Timber Company, arrives at Tonawanda Island to select a homesite.

Albany - The first Young Men's Association is founded in Albany. ** Erastus Corning is made president of the Utica and Schenectady Rail Road. ** Tammany
politicians make an amendment to a bill outlawing debtors' prison, reinstating imprisonment for debts under $50. The bill does not pass. ** A state investigation uncovers Tammany graft in New York City's Seventh Ward Bank.

Auburn
A stone jail is erected in the rear of Auburn's courthouse. ** A state investigative team tours the women's quarters of the prison, is appalled at conditions.

Buffalo
An extension to South Pier is made and the "Chinaman" Lighthouse is erected on it. ** A total of 61,485 passengers pass through the harbor. 42,956 of them board lake vessels heading west. ** The approximate date twenty-year-old New Hampshire transplant Gibson T. Williams arrives from St. Albans, Vermont, gets a job as a clerk in the Kimberly & Waters grocery store, at $5 a week.

Rochester
Church sextons are fined if they fail to ring church bells during fires. ** The Rochester Canal & Railway Company blocks a scheme to build a rival rail line between Rochester and Charlotte, along the west side of the Genesee River. ** The three-mile Carthage Railroad is founded, to connect the Erie Canal aqueduct with the village of Carthage. ** Edwin Scrantom sells the Monroe Republican and enters the mercantile business with Levi W. Sibley, his brother-in-law. ** The Reverend Jedediah Burchard holds revival meetings in town. ** The Daily Democrat begins publication.

 

1834


Jan 25
Herkimer County's first courthouse and jail, in the village of Herkimer, burns to the ground. ** Fire destroys business buildings on Rochester's Main Street Bridge.

February
Rochester's "Obediah Dogberry" publishes the final edition of his weekly journal the Liberal Advocate.

Feb 11
New York's Platt Street is opened.

Feb 17
Erastus Shepard and Alvah Strong, having bought Rochester's Advertiser, change the name to the Daily Democrat.

Feb 18
The first U. S, labor newspaper The Man is published in New York City.

Feb 28
The St. Lawrence County Town of Depau is renamed Hermon.

March
The Cultivator, the official organ of New York's State Agricultural Society, sponsored by Stephen Van Rensselaer and James Wadsworth, is published by Jesse Buel.

April
Davy Crockett begins a political tour of Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston.

Apr 5
The Madison County village of Clarkville is incorporated.

Apr 18
The Brooklyn & Jamaica Railroad is completed. The Long Island Railroad (LIRR) buys it and begins laying rails to the east of the line.

Apr 24
The New York State Legislature grants a charter to the Long Island Railroad. ** The Lockport & Niagara Falls Rail Road is incorporated, capitalized at $175,000. It's later merged with the New York Central Rail Road.

Apr 28
Rochester is incorporated as a city.

May 3
Binghamton is incorporated as a village in a new charter. Its limits are enlarged and its territory divided into 5 wards.

May 6
James Gordon Bennett begins publishing the New York Tribune.

May 12
The new building of the Albany Female Academy is completed.

May 23
Benjamin Wright, appointed by New York to survey the route for the New York and Erie Rail Road, sets out with assistants James Seymour and Charles Ellet. They finish by the end of the year.

June
James Fenimore Cooper's A Letter to His Countrymen is published, urging Americans to not defer to foreign opinion. He revisits Cooperstown after a seventeen-year absence.

Jun 4
Missionary Dr. Peter Parker sails for China aboard New York merchant David Olyphant's Morrison.

Jun 9
Jonathan Child is elected by Rochester's council as the city's first mayor.

Jun 10
Over 3,000 people gather at Brown's Race to celebrate Child's inauguration.

Jun 28
An engine explodes on New York City's Harlem Railroad shortly after its first run. ** Congress approves the new New Jersey-New York State border.

Jul 1
New York City firemen Eugene Underhill and Frederick A. Ward are killed when a wall falls on them while they're fighting a fire at Haydock's drug store on Pearl Street.

Jul 4
New York City's annual Convention of People of Color sets July 4th as a day of prayer and contemplation of the condition of blacks. ** Rioters break up a meeting of the Chatham Street Chapel in New York City because of blacks in the audience.

Jul 11
Chicago's harbor is completed. Captain Augustus Pickering;'s schooner Illinois , from Sackets Harbor, New York, is the first large ship to enter it.

Jul 12
Anti-abolition riots in New York City end after eight days.

October
James Fenimore Cooper purchases the family seat at Otsego.

December
Cooper begins writing a series of articles on the U. S. and Europe for the New York Evening Post, under the pen name A. B. C.

Dec 3
The first U. S. dental society is organized, in New York City.

City
Steam railroad carriages are introduced on the new New York and Harlem Railroad, but only above 14th Street. Later in the year it's extended to Yorkville. ** Author James Fenimore Cooper moves his family to a townhouse at 4 St. Marks Place. ** New Jersey agrees to make its Bedloe's Island part of New York. ** Jacksonian Democrat Cornelius Van Wyck Lawrence becomes the city's first directly elected mayor, defeating Whig writer Gulian C. Verplanck. ** Abolitionist Rev. Samuel Hansen Cox, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, has his church and home ransacked because of his views. ** The National Trades Union is organized by the General Trades Union. ** An English book is released here, setting the rules for the game of Rounders, and the same rules for Base Ball and Goal Ball. ** The Town of Brooklyn is incorporated as a city. Kings County now includes Brooklyn and the towns of Bushwick, Flatbush, Flatlands, Gravesend and New Utrecht. ** The American Female Guardian Society and Home for the Friendless is organized, with offices at 29 East 28th Street.

State
The federal government complete two piers at the mouth of the Genesee River, extending 2,876 feet into Lake Ontario, beyond the sand bars. ** Carpenter-sculptor Erastus Dow Palmer moves to Dunkirk. ** Albany's Lancasterian School is superseded by the state public school system. ** A survey is authorized for a Genesee Valley Canal. ** The village of Le Roy is incorporated. ** The Cohoes Company completes most of its hydraulic canals. ** Geneva lawyer Charles Butler moves to New York City. ** Young William Nowlin's family arrives in the Detroit area, having traveled from New York's Putnam County. ** Herkimer's new jail and its Reformed Church are built. ** Bissell Humphrey's tavern in Batavia is destroyed by fire. It's replaced by the Eagle Tavern. ** The Cayuga County town of Cato annexes part of the town of Ira. ** The Chautauqua County courthouse is built at Mayville, at a cost of $11,000. ** John Jennings leaves Painted Post's Patterson Inn to his daughter. ** The charter of the Auburn and Owasco Canal Company is renewed. The canal is never built. ** The walls of the Erie Canal lock at Tonawanda are raised a foot to bring the river water closer to the canal's level.

Brooklyn
Brooklyn is incorporated as a city. ** A street grid is laid out for the Red Hook and Gowanus neighborhoods.

Buffalo
The Buffalo & Black Rock Land and Railroad Company opens a horse railway between the city and a horse ferry to Canada. ** Weekly steamboat service between Buffalo and Chicago is inaugurated. ** 80,000 people leave Buffalo headed for the West.

Rochester
Carthage Landing and part of Brighton are annexed. The new city covers 7.148 square miles, and contains a population of nearly 16,000. ** The approved state charter includes authority for a municipal waterworks. The common council responds by building cisterns. ** The Habitual Drinkers List, a compulsory register of local drunks, is published. ** Author Nathaniel Hawthorne visits the city. ** General A. W. Riley opens a boatyard at the east end of the Court Street Bridge, operates it through 1836.

Syracuse
The New York State Upstate Medical Center is built. ** Village trustees offer Captain Oliver Teall a 35 year franchise to supply water. He again does nothing.

 

1835


( Updated 2 / 27 / 2005 )


January
Anti-Irish-Catholic street fights again break out in New York City's Five Points district.

Jan 24
Historian and Cornell University president Charles Kendall Adams is born to farmer Charles Adams and Maria Shedd Adams, at Derby, Vermont.

March
Anti-Irish-Catholic street fights again break out in the Five Points district for the second time this year.

Mar 12
Albany's Young Men's Association is incorporated.

April
Canandaigua stage line co-owner Chanuncey Coe dies.

Apr 13
An act is introduced in Delaware County for a tax in several school districts, for the founding of a district library.

Apr 17
The Schuyler County Town of Dix is formed from the Chemung County Town of Catlin.

May 6
James Gordon Bennett founds the New York Herald, a penny newspaper.

May 12
A mob of 300 anti-Rent farmers descends on Batavia's Holland Land Office. The sheriff and 120 men arrest the leaders.

May 20
While visiting London, James S. Wadsworth is made a member of the "Committee of the Travellers" Club for the month of June.

June
Rumors spread through New York City that the Irish in Five Points intend to form their own militia company.

Jun 16
Civil War soldier Ira Smith Brown is born in Yates County to Morris Brown.

Jun 21
Several thousand native-born and Irish immigrants participate in riots in Five Points. Dozens are injured. Dr. William McCaffery, an Irish Whig, has his jaw broken by a tossed brick and is thrown to the ground and stomped on, having several ribs broken.

Jun 22
Rioting resumes at Chatham Street near Pearl and Orange, soon spreading southward and to the north. A Mr. O'Brien's house is stoned and St. Patrick's Cathedral on Mott Street is threatened. Dr. McCaffery dies from his wounds.

Jun 23
An English-born piano maker has also been killed. The rioters are eventually dispersed.

July
A fugitive slave family named Stanford is kidnapped from St. Catharines, Ontario, and taken to Buffalo. Blacks of both cities free the Stanfords at Hamburg, and return them to Canada after a clash between liberators and a sheriff's posse at Black Rock.

Aug 6
Naturalist Constantine Rafinesque lectures at the Lansingburgh Academy on The Study of Natural Science.

Aug 7
Rafinesque lectures at the Waterford Academy on the science's relation to mankind.

Aug 9
Rafinesque lectures at Troy Court House on The Instability of Nature, arguing that instability is a law of nature.

Aug 10
The editor of the Waterford Atlas leads an expedition to the summit of Mount Rafinesque.

Aug 21
Sir John Herschel's moon hoax begins, published in the New York Sun.

Oct 6
Charles Frederick Wadsworth is born to James Samuel and Mary Craig Wharton Wadsworth of Geneseo, their first child.

Oct 21
An anti-Abolitionist mob in Utica trashes the type and presses of Quartus Graves's Standard and Democrat.

Oct 25
Baking soda manufacturer Henry Addison Deland is born in Newark Valley, New York.

Oct 29
During a Tammany Hall meeting in New York City the lights are put out by the conservative opponents of the radical Jacksonian Democrats (Equal Righters) faction, which responds by lighting candles and locofoco friction matches, earning the sobriquet Loco-Focos.

Oct 31
Bela Coe, Buffalo, brother of the late Chauncey Coe, sells his half of their stage line business to silent partner Benjamin Rathbun for $20,000.

November
Coe sells the Canandaigua franchise of the stage business to Rathbun, making the latter sole proprietor. Rathbun will put employees Benjamin F. Hadduck and Granville Kimball in charge of the livery stable end of the business. The line runs three stages to Albany, and others to Rochester, Niagara Falls and Canada.

Nov 23
Henry Burden of Troy patents a horseshoe-making machine.

Nov 27
A small steam vessel enters New York's Oneida Lake by way of the Oneida River, crosses to Rotterdam (today's Constantia).

Nov 28
The steamer leaves the Lake via the Oneida River, the first steamboat on the lake.

Dec 16
The Anti-Masonic Party meets at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and nominates William Henry Harrison for President of the U. S. and New York's Francis Granger for Vice President. ** A fire breaks out in lower Manhattan in the vicinity of Hanover Square, in sub-zero weather, when fire hydrants are frozen.

Dec 18
The New York City fire is finally put out. 654 buildings are destroyed; the damage is estimated at $20,000,000. The city council authorizes $6,000,000 in loans, at 5% interest, to banks and insurance companies. Nothing is done for the heavily impacted poor.

City
The population reaches 270,089. ** The city's jurisdiction over underwater lands is extended. ** Sculptor Thomas Crawford moves to Rome to study under Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldson. ** Recent Bavarian immigrant Jakob Uhl goes to work for the New Yorker Staats Zeitung newspaper. ** Former New York governor and U. S. vice-president Daniel D. Tompkins, dies, in his early sixties. ** Over a thousand ships enter New York harbor from 150 foreign ports. ** J. R. McDowell begins publishing McDowell's Journal . It will eventually become The Advocate of Moral Reform and Family Guardian . ** Inventor Samuel F. B. Morse publishes a series of anti Catholic articles in city newspapers, claiming a plot to overthrow the U. S. government. ** The City Council (backed by Tammany) fights an attempt by the Peaconic Company (backed by the Tammany splinter group Equal Rights party) to begin a second ferry line to Brooklyn. The Equal Righters take over the meeting, back a plan to create a state board of commissioners. The board is created by the legislature later in the year and a second route is granted. ** The merchant-shipping firm of Anson G. Phelps & Elisha Peck closes its doors at John and Front streets. ** Wine and tobacco merchant Fernando Wood opens a ship chandlery.

State
Brockport's Baptist Institute opens. ** One of the five steamboats regularly stopping at the Genesee River skips its visits. ** Work begins at Piermont on a railroad to link the Hudson River to Dunkirk, passing through the Southern Tier. ** Part of the town of the Allegany County town of West Almond is split off from Alfred. ** Frederick C. Mills, newly-elected chief engineer of the Genesee Valley Canal, presents a report based on last year's survey. ** Ship's carpenter Francis C. Pollay is born in Pulteney. ** Civil War officer John Henry Martindale graduates from West Point. ** Farmer Peter Hill comes to Wayne County. His son Edmund, a future lawyer, is born in Junius, Seneca County. ** Erastus Corning, Thomas W. Olcott and other investors found the Corning Company, to develop mineral deposits at Blossburg. ** High anti-land office feeling breaks out in Chautauqua County's Mayville, and local farmers burn the office there. ** Receiving a request for an autograph by England's Princess Victoria, James Fenimore Cooper sends her a manuscript of The Minikins. He and his family spend the summer in Cooperstown. ** Early Connewango settler Experience Fairbanks dies. ** Ann Smith, daughter of abolitionist Gerrit Smith and his wife Ann, dies at the age of 12. ** Gerrit Smith witnesses a Utica mob break up an antislavery meeting, becomes an abolitionist. ** Traditional date a farmer named Brown brings hops to the Bristol area. ** Le Roy lawyer and former state senator Herman J. Redfield moves his practice to Batavia. ** Plans for a series of lectures in Troy on antiquities, to be given by naturalist Constantine Rafinesque, are called off. He visits horticulturist Alexander Walsh in Lansingburgh. While there he meets the Reverend Elijah Wiley. They visit a nearby mountain, variously known as Bald Mountain, Lansingburgh Mountain or Mount Washington, which Wiley renames Mount Rafinesque. ** The approximate date the Greek Revival style of architecture reaches western New York. ** The population of the Town of Mendon reaches 3,404. ** The wife of Penn Yan's Captain William Henry Stewart dies. ** The approximate date con man William Avery Rockefeller drifts into the Richford area. ** $1,548,100 in tolls are collected on state canals. ** This year state ports clear 373,465 tons of domestic goods and 90,999 tons of foreign goods. ** Albany mayor Erastus Corning is re-elected for three more consecutive one-year terms. ** Canandaigua's 1818 Methodist church is relocated from Chapel Street to Main Street at a cost of $1,200. ** A settlement is begun at Raquette Lake. ** The population of Montgomery County (most of the state west of Albany) reaches 1,000,000. ** East Boston Timber Company president Stephen White builds Beechwater, a $18,000 mansion on Tonawanda Island (later White Island). ** The New York and Erie Rail Road company is reorganized; 40 miles of track are put out to contract. ** The state authorizes the enlargement of the Erie Canal. The canal has reduced travel time across the state to 6 days and freight costs to four-to-six dollars a ton.

Buffalo
The city's population reaches 15,573. ** Escaped slave William Wells Brown, a steamboat crew member, arrives and begins helping other former slaves escape to Canada. ** 15-year-old Alexander Sloan begins working on the docks. ** Harvey Peek opens a downtown hotel.

Cooperstown
Cherry Valley's newspaper The Watchtower moves to Cooperstown and Israel W. Clark becomes the publisher. ** The approximate date the Samuel Nelson House is built on Main Street for the Associate Supreme Court Justice.

Geneseo
Allen Warner, James Percival, Elias Clark and William. H. Kelsey sell their share in The Livingston Register to partner Richard M. Miel. Soon afterwards he sells the newspaper to D. S. Curtis. ** Charles Colt is elected village president, serves through 1839.

Geneva
Domestic School founders William and Caroline Kirkland leave Geneva for Detroit, Michigan, where William becomes head of the Detroit Female Seminary. ** John Johnston of Geneva introduces agricultural tile drainage to the U. S. ** Phineas Prouty, Sr. builds Maple Hill (later the LaFayette Inn).

Rochester
Novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne visits the city. ** A winter flood damages the Main Street Bridge and buildings on it. ** The Rochester common council changes Court Street to Monroe Avenue, named for the former U. S. president. ** The Whigs, having followed a restrictive policy regarding liquor licenses, are defeated at the polls by the Democrats. Whig mayor Jonathan Child, unable to carry out a program of which he disapproves, resigns. A second city election is held. Miller Charles J. Hill is named an election supervisor. ** The city's nascent clothing industry accounts for more than $100,000 this year. ** Railroad engineer David Dickson, Jr. is born. ** The city has four millraces and 21 mills.
moves to Cooperstown and Israel W. Clark becomes the publisher. ** The approximate date the Samuel Nelson House is built on Main Street for the Associate Supreme Court Justice.

Geneseo
Allen Warner, James Percival, Elias Clark and William. H. Kelsey sell their share in The Livingston Register to partner Richard M. Miel. Soon afterwards he sells the newspaper to D. S. Curtis. ** Charles Colt is elected village president, serves through 1839.

Geneva
Domestic School founders William and Caroline Kirkland leave Geneva for Detroit, Michigan, where William becomes head of the Detroit Female Seminary. ** John Johnston of Geneva introduces agricultural tile drainage to the U. S. ** Phineas Prouty, Sr. builds Maple Hill (later the LaFayette Inn).

Rochester
Novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne visits the city. ** A winter flood damages the Main Street Bridge and buildings on it. ** The Rochester common council changes Court Street to Monroe Avenue, named for the former U. S. president. ** The Whigs, having followed a restrictive policy regarding liquor licenses, are defeated at the polls by the Democrats. Whig mayor Jonathan Child, unable to carry out a program of which he disapproves, resigns. A second city election is held. Miller Charles J. Hill is named an election supervisor. ** The city's nascent clothing industry accounts for more than $100,000 this year. ** Railroad engineer David Dickson, Jr. is born. ** The city has four millraces and 21 mills.

 

© 2005 David Minor / Eagles Byte

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